It's natural for your weight to fluctuate during the year. A swing of a few pounds up or down is normal—and nothing to worry about.

There's no doubt about it: dieting sucks. Not only because you feel hungry all the time and deprive yourself of your favorite foods—dieting's also unsustainable in the long-term.

No matter how much weight you want to lose, a better approach is to make healthy eating part of your overall lifestyle, rather than a temporary punishment. Do this, and watch as the weight drops off naturally, without ever going on a diet.

Lose Weight

Here are 7 Ways to Lose Weight Without Trying

Painless weight loss tricks

Meticulous meal planning. Counting every calorie you consume. Spending an entire weekend cooking healthy meals for the following week. Finding even more time to exercise. Sure, these weight-loss strategies work, but they can be awfully time consuming. Enter our slacker's guide to weight loss. The following 16 no-effort tweaks can be applied to your current routine instantly.

Eat 30 grams of protein for breakfast to lose weight

protein

Protein is what keeps you full, fuels your muscles, and helps you lose weight or maintain weight loss. Plus, since protein is harder for your body to break down than carbohydrates, you’ll actually increase your metabolism when you eat a meal high in protein versus one full of mostly carbs.

Getting in 30 grams of protein within 30 minutes of waking can not only speed up fat loss, it can also make you feel fuller, less snacky, and feel satisfied for longer.

Keep good food close

Laziness plays a bigger role in your food choices—both good and bad—than you might think, suggests another study published in Appetite. Undergraduates at Saint Bonaventure University in Upstate New York were separated into three groups: one that sat with apple slices within reach and buttered popcorn roughly six feet away, one with the popcorn within reach and the apple slices six feet away, and one with both snacks within reach.

Skip the nonfat to lose weight

It's a habit that many of us picked up when lowfat diets were the craze in the 90s—and it's been a tough one for people to break.

See, when most people think of eating fat, they think it will make them fat. But surprisingly, it's really just the opposite. Because not only will eating fat make your skin softer, hair and nails healthier and cushion your joints, it's also what helps you get full at a meal, gives you long-term energy and keeps you from craving unhealthy stuff an hour after you last ate.

Include more healthy fats like avocados, nuts, olive oil, and coconut into your diet, and you'll soon find your cravings decreasing, your appetite normalizing and weight loss becoming more effortless than ever.

Take a Rest

 nonfat

The better way to indulge in your lazy tendencies is to to get more sleep. Sleeping fewer than than five hours a night could send the scale soaring 30% higher than if you got seven hours or more, suggests a study published in the American Journal of Epidemiology.

Forget about diet soda to lose weight

diet soda

Research out of the University of Texas at Austin found that people who drank diet soda tended to have larger waists. After following 474 people for about a decade, they found that those who drank diet soda had a 70% greater increase in waist circumferences compared with non-drinkers. What's more: people who consumed two or more diet sodas a day saw a 500% greater increase.

Don't drown your food

Bypassing dips and dressings can help shave off calories. “While a few dabs won't break you, a little here and a little there will jeopardize your weight loss efforts,” says Buchus. Most creamy dips can rack up the calorie count to over 100 calories and 10 to 15 grams fat for only four tablespoons.

 

 

References
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